Guardian Media Group cuts losses by more than a third

The parent company of the Guardian and Observer cut its losses by more than a third to £45m in the last financial year and more than quadrupled its number of paying members, as it seeks to break even within two years. Guardian Media Group said total revenues increased by 2.4% to £214.5m in the year to 2 April, thanks to the popularity of its membership scheme, one-off contributions and growth in international operations

read more

Diversified announces ambitious organic event for the capital

Press Release: Diversified Communications, organisers of the highly successful natural and organic trade shows in London, Scandinavia, Hong Kong and Australia, and publishers of Natural Products magazine and Natural Products Global, have announced the launch of a major new consumer event, The Go Organic Festival, to take place at London’s iconic Battersea Park, over the weekend of 8-9 September 2018

read more

How the spirit of Felix Dennis lives on

Flashes& Flames blog: Digital disruption is full of contradictions for legacy media. Condé Nast splashed more than $100m on its trumpeted but short-lived plan to become an online fashion retailer. Less expensively, Hearst came to a similar conclusion. But, as magazines everywhere wonder whether e-commerce can ever fill the advertising gap, one UK publisher is quietly selling more than 250 cars every month to its readers.

read more

Magazine Media’s Dismal Record in Public Equity Markets

When Time Inc. declared it was putting the brakes on a potential sale, the announcement served — among other things — as a reminder that the public equity markets have not been kind to magazine media. Time Inc. spun out from Time Warner in 2014, emerging as a standalone company with some of the most storied magazine brands in history, but also $1.3 billion in debt and a lengthening record of declining revenue. Last year was no exception, with revenue falling to just under $3.1 billion. In 2010, by contrast, the company’s revenue was $3.7 billion. Time Inc.’s stock peaked at $25.62 just a month or so after the spinoff, and after a rally in early 2015, it’s never gotten close to that point again. It was trading at under $15 early this week.

read more

Programmatic Is Failing

Not showing advertisers their own ads has been the elephant in the programmatic room from day one. The minute clients like Marc Pritchard at P&G — and others like him working for premium brands — start requesting “checking copies” of their online ads, programmatic advertising will have a huge problem

read more

The Economist Claims a Trump Bump

The Economist is following the trend of Trump-era subscription success, with a growth of 19 percent in North American digital subscriptions since the election. This puts the London-based magazine in the ranks of Vanity Fair, The New York Times, and The Atlantic, which have all seen subscriptions surge since November

read more

Luxury magazines finally face digital headwinds

The luxury magazine market, for so long a well-heeled haven from the turmoil facing the rest of the print media industry, could be about to confront the same headwinds battering other magazines and newspapers. Analysts say that glossy magazines such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and Vanity Fair are starting to see a shift in readers and advertisers to online social media platforms such as Instagram and Facebook. But they are also being hit by forces specific to the industry that has for so long offered them protection.

read more

Publishers warm to Google plan for Chrome ad-blocker

US and European publishers have given support to the idea of Google introducing an ad-blocker to its widely used Chrome internet browser despite fears it would hit their online advertising revenues. Details of the technology group’s plans have not been disclosed but Google has said it held “initial conversations” on the idea with publishers.

read more

Telegraph finds way to profits in age of digital disruption

The Daily Telegraph is a rare beast: a British newspaper that makes healthy profits. All around it, the news industry is being upended by plunging revenues from print advertising and the migration of digital advertising to Facebook and Google. But in 2015, the Telegraph Media Group made a £48m pre-tax profit on a turnover of £320m, a slight improvement on the £46m it made in 2014. It is still Britain’s biggest-selling quality daily paper, though its print circulation has fallen from its peak of more than 1m papers a day in the early 2000s to 457,331 in February, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation.

read more

Future issues encouraging H1 Update

Press Release: Future plc (LSE: FUTR, “the Group”), the international media group and leading digital business, provides a trading update for the six months to 31 March 2017. Overall trading for the year to date has been positive. The Group’s Media division is performing strongly with the fast growing revenue streams of e-commerce and events up around 70% and 15% year on year respectively. As a result the Board’s expectation for the Group’s results for both the first six months and the financial year as a whole remain uncharged

read more

The Times subscriptions sales jump 200%

The Times has seen subscriptions sales jump 200 percent in the last year, since it pivoted from publishing on a breaking-news cycle to a digital editions-based publishing strategy a year ago. Subscriber churn is also at a record low, down 4 percentage points compared to the previous year, according to Catherine Newman, chief marketing officer at The Times and Sunday Times. Last summer, total print and digital paying subscribers rested at 413,600, according to the publisher. And in the first half of 2016, new paying-subscriber sales rose 200 percent compared to the first half of 2015

read more

YouTube controversy shakes up digital advertising as brands pull adverts

Over the past five years, Google and Facebook have cut a conquering swath through the market for digital advertising, snatching ever more business from legacy media companies, such as print newspapers and magazines. But a growing scandal involving the inadvertent placement of ads next to extremist content on Google’s YouTube video has raised questions about whether the balance of power is about to shift again.

read more

Big news brings only tiny returns for publishers

Publishers need to find additional sources of revenue and, worryingly, the new generation of so-called “distributed content” services, which held such promise a year ago, are not cutting the mustard. Services such as Facebook Instant Articles, Apple News and Google Accelerated Mobile Pages were supposed to make it easier for publishers to monetise their journalism.

read more