Flashes&Flames: Can Axel Springer do the ‘impossible’?

Stories about the reinvention of daily newspaper companies are often not what they seem. They tend to involve traditional media groups not so much investing in the future of news as placing their bets somewhere else entirely. Thus, the UK’s Daily Mail Group, and Hearst Corp, in the US, are investing more heavily in business media and entertainment. And even Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is now generating 35% of its profit and all its growth from digital property listings

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Dentsu Aegis Network reports 9.4% growth for 2015

Dentsu Group has posted revenue of YEN 818.57 billion (£4.96 billion) for 2015 – a 12.8 per cent year on year increase. Gross profit for the Japanese group’s full year 2015 results stood at YEN 761.996 billion, a 12.6 per cent rise, with organic gross profit growth increasing by 7.0 per cent

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Apple Brings Subscription Content To News App

Apple is preparing to bring content from subscription publications to its News app, allowing subscribers to access paid content directly through the news service. That means they won’t have to visit the publisher’s app or Web site, according to Reuters

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Why inflight magazines will continue to fly (despite Wi-Fi)

Headquartered in London, Ink Global is the largest publisher of inflight magazines in the world, producing magazines for 25 of the world’s largest airlines reaching the eyeballs of 656 million passengers annually. Editorial Director Kerstin Zumstein explains to Piet van Niekerk why she believes print magazines on aircrafts will be around for many years to come

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Guardian to cut £54m of costs and introduce paid-for content

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an will cut costs by 20 per cent, and could make some of its journalism available only to paying members, after a sharp fall in print advertising hit the newspaper’s financial performance

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